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Apr 21 2020

Shame dictionary




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shame definition: Shame is a painful feeling of regret, guilt or embarrassment. (noun) An example of shame is a wife feeling guilty about cheating on her husband….



Neil felt shame when he woke up and realized he had been sleeping on a passenger’s shoulder on the subway train.

An example of shame is a wife feeling guilty about cheating on her husband.

MLA Style

APA Style

  1. a painful feeling of having lost the respect of others because of the improper behavior, incompetence, etc. of oneself or of someone that one is close to or associated with
  2. a tendency to have feelings of this kind, or a capacity for such feeling
  3. dishonor or disgrace: to bring shame to one’s family
  4. a person or thing that brings shame, dishonor, or disgrace
  5. something regrettable, unfortunate, or outrageous: it’s a shame that he wasn’t told

Origin of shame

Middle English from Old English scamu, akin to German scham

shamed , sham′ing

  1. to cause to feel shame; make ashamed
  2. to dishonor or disgrace
  3. to drive, force, or impel by a sense of shame: shamed into apologizing

  1. to cause to feel shame
  2. to do much better than; surpass; outdo

MLA Style

APA Style

shamed,sham·ing,shames

Origin of shame

Middle English from Old English sceamu

MLA Style

APA Style

  1. Uncomfortable or painful feeling due to recognition or consciousness of impropriety, dishonor, or other wrong in the opinion of the person experiencing the feeling. It is caused by awareness of exposure of circumstances of unworthiness or of improper or indecent conduct. When I realized that I had hurt my friend, I felt deep shame.The teenager couldn’t bear the shame of introducing his parents.
  2. Something to regret. It was a shame not to see the show after driving all that way.
  3. Reproach incurred or suffered; dishonour; ignominy; derision.
  4. (archaic) That which is shameful and private, especially body parts. Cover your shame!

From M >scamu, scomu, sceamu, sceomu (“shame”), from Proto-Germanic *skamō, and thus cognate with Old High German skama (whence German Scham), Old Dutch skama (Dutch schaamte), Old Frisian skame (West Frisian skamte), and Old Norse skÇ«mm (whence Icelandic skömm, Danish skam). From Proto-Indo-European *ḱem- (“cover, shroud”), which may also be the source of heaven; see that entry for details.

Compare also Persian شرم (Å¡arm) and Tosk Albanian shaj (“to insult, offend, slander”) / Gheg Albanian shamë (“an insult, offence”).

(third-person singular simple present shames, present participle shaming, simple past and past participle shamed)

I do shame / To think of what a noble strain you are. “” Shakespeare.

  • To cause to feel shame. I was shamed by the teacher’s public disapproval.
  • To cover with reproach or ignominy; to dishonour; to disgrace.
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    Shame dictionary

    SOURCE: http://www.yourdictionary.com/shame


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